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Appendix

 

The data for Figures 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 are shown below:

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Multivariate analysis

The multivariate analysis technique used is stepwise logistic regression, about which more details can be found in the Technical details chapter. The dependent variable is satisfaction ("very satisfied" or "satisfied") "with the way in which the National Health Service runs nowadays". A positive coefficient indicates that the group is more likely than the reference group (shown in brackets) to be satisfied, while a negative coefficient indicates that the group is less likely to be satisfied. We controlled for standard demographic factors - sex, age and region - though Table A.4 shows that these were not significant. The independent variables entered into the model were: household income, highest educational qualification, party identification, satisfaction with GPs / Accident and emergency / Dentists / Inpatients / Outpatients, recent contact with Outpatients / Inpatients, views on how NHS performance had changed over the last five years, views on how NHS performance would change over the next five years, and views on whether the NHS would be free to all in 10 years time.


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Notes
  1. The International Social Survey Programme is conducted annually in 48 countries. In Britain it is carried out as part of the British Social Attitudes study, with funding from the Economic and Social Research Council. For more details see the website: www.issp.org/index.php
  2. People with experience include those answering "Yes, just me", "Yes, not me, but a close family member or friend", and "Yes, both me and a close family member or friend" to questions about use of inpatients and/or outpatients in the last 12 months
  3. The bases for Table 5.4 are as follows:

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  4. There have been minor variations to this question over the years. From 1983 to 1994 the answer options were "support" and "oppose"; from 1995 to 2010 the answer options were "support a lot", "support a little", "oppose a lot" and "oppose a little", with respondents being prompted to say "a little" or "a lot". In 2011 the same four answer options were retained but presented to respondents on a showcard.
  5. Readings are indicated by data marker; the line indicates an overall pattern but where there is no data marker the line cannot be taken as a reading for that year.
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  • Notes
    1. The International Social Survey Programme is conducted annually in 48 countries. In Britain it is carried out as part of the British Social Attitudes study, with funding from the Economic and Social Research Council. For more details see the website: www.issp.org/index.php
    2. People with experience include those answering "Yes, just me", "Yes, not me, but a close family member or friend", and "Yes, both me and a close family member or friend" to questions about use of inpatients and/or outpatients in the last 12 months
    3. The bases for Table 5.4 are as follows:

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    4. There have been minor variations to this question over the years. From 1983 to 1994 the answer options were "support" and "oppose"; from 1995 to 2010 the answer options were "support a lot", "support a little", "oppose a lot" and "oppose a little", with respondents being prompted to say "a little" or "a lot". In 2011 the same four answer options were retained but presented to respondents on a showcard.
    5. Readings are indicated by data marker; the line indicates an overall pattern but where there is no data marker the line cannot be taken as a reading for that year.
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