Transport / The effect of transport

The effect of transport on climate change

Turning more specifically to the effect of transport on climate change, we examine to what extent people are concerned about pollution from motor vehicles and its consequences for the environment. Each year since the middle of the last decade, we have asked:

undefinedHow concerned are you about exhaust fumes from traffic?

How concerned are you about the effect of transport on climate change?2

[Very concerned, fairly concerned, not very concerned, not at all concerned]

Table 4.2 shows that, although most people are worried about exhaust pollution and the effect of transport on climate change, the level of concern has decreased since 2005. In both cases, the proportions expressing concern have declined from around 80 per cent to about 65 per cent. This downward trend was highlighted by Taylor (2011b) a year ago, and the latest data show it has continued.
 

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We have already noted how people's belief in climate change caused by humans follows a similar pattern among demographic groups to concerns about the consequences of climate change for the environment. In Table 4.3 we see, in addition, that concern about exhaust fumes and the effect of transport on climate change is highest among those who believe that human actions are at least partly to blame for climate change (74 per cent on both measures). Interestingly, almost four in ten people who do not believe in climate change nevertheless express concern about exhaust pollution. This seems likely to reflect the fact that exhaust fumes can be considered detrimental to personal health as well as the environment.
 

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Notes
  1. Speech by David Cameron at Department of Energy and Climate Change, www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/pn10_059/pn10_059.aspx
  2. This question does not ask specifically about car use, but is placed with other questions about road transport.
  3. It has previously been noted that those most concerned about the environment can often themselves be the most frequent flyers (Commission for Integrated Transport, 2007).
  4. Transport policy in Scotland is devolved so this would only apply in England and Wales.
  5. 
The multivariate analysis technique used was logistic regression - more details of the methods used can be found in the Technical details chapter of this report. Further details of the analysis results are available from the authors on request.
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  • Notes
    1. Speech by David Cameron at Department of Energy and Climate Change, www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/pn10_059/pn10_059.aspx
    2. This question does not ask specifically about car use, but is placed with other questions about road transport.
    3. It has previously been noted that those most concerned about the environment can often themselves be the most frequent flyers (Commission for Integrated Transport, 2007).
    4. Transport policy in Scotland is devolved so this would only apply in England and Wales.
    5. 
The multivariate analysis technique used was logistic regression - more details of the methods used can be found in the Technical details chapter of this report. Further details of the analysis results are available from the authors on request.
  • Related links